Tunis Village: An escape from the big city 

Thursday afternoon Peter sent me this picture: a map with the route from Cairo to Fayoum, a small city two hours southwest of Cairo. He told me to go home and pack a bag because he planned a surprise weekend getaway for us!
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We stayed at a little villa in Tunis Village, a small village outside of Fayoum. It was owned by a woman who immigrated from Switzerland when she was 24 years old.. She eventually made Egypt her home and opened a pottery school, which has become a favorite place for locals, tourists, and expats to visit. In fact, Tunis Village is well known for it’s pottery and many Europeans come for 6-months at a time for training in the craft of pottery making
Upon our arrival in Tunis Village, we were taken to the cozy little cottage that we would be staying in. It had a beautiful terrace overlooking the lake and desert mountains. Like the Florida girl I am, I immediately changed into my bathing suit and was ready for the pool. The weather in Cairo has been in the low 70s, and finally this weekend it hit mid 80s, making for the perfect pool day.
In the evening, as is our tradition when we are on holiday, Peter and I walked through neighborhoods exploring the village. Tunis Village is actually smaller than the size of a typical neighborhood in Cairo! All of the roads are unpaved, most of the houses unfinished. Cows, donkeys, and goats roam the streets. Women sit on the front steps watching their children, most of whom are barefoot, play soccer outside. Life is simple. Very simple. We stopped along the way to look at the pottery which was beautifully handcrafted by the village potters. Of course we had to support the local economy by purchasing our fair share! On the way back to the cottage we stopped for a cup of tea at a local cafe, and after fighting off the mosquitos we headed back to our cottage to make dinner.
The next morning, we had our own pottery lesson from Karim, a 30 year old Tunis Village native, who has been working in pottery his entire life. He told us he had grown up very poor, but when he had his first pottery lesson he had molded something that he was proud of and that became the source of his happiness. He saw the schoolchildren before him graduate and become successful pottery artists, and he knew one day he would do the same. And now, here he is, teaching in Evelyn’s Pottery School, selling his own art, and traveling throughout Europe on pottery exchange trips and gallery exhibitions.
He explained the process of pottery making from start to finish- telling us how a pile of clay would become a glazed plate, bowl, or cup. And then it was our turn to test it out!  He handed both of us an apron (so we would at least look the part) and a hunk of clay that we would have to mold into the design of our choice!
Karim led us over to this contraption that was the pottery wheel. This isn’t the electric kind. Nope. We had to kick the wheel at the bottom to keep it spinning. He explained that the artist has more control that way, but it definitely takes much more coordination! Peter went first, wanting to make a plate. Karim guided him through the process, helping with one hand, and voila, Peter’s plate!
When it was my turn, I was a little nervous at first since pottery was never my forte (as I well know from my senior year ceramics class in high school), but it turns out that Karim helped me discover my hidden talent! If my MBA plans fall through, I have a future in Tunis Village as a pottery maker! It’s always good to have a Plan B! I don’t know how it happened, but Karim took his hand off of my pot and all of a sudden I turned it into a plate! I was quite proud, if you can’t tell.
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The Road Less Traveled

With this blog, I want to take all of you on my crazy, destionation-less journey, so here goes the first post…

For all of you that know me, I don’t walk. I don’t stroll, I don’t amble, I don’t meander, I don’t wander. And when I do, it’s with a purpose. So when my boyfriend, Peter, mentioned that he was really keen on picking a random local neighborhood in Cairo that we would never find ourselves in other than by happenstance and just “walk”. I was less than thrilled by the idea to be honest.

But we walked.

We chose a very “shaaby” (local) neighborhood, Sayeda Zeinab, in Cairo, full of winding streets littered with garbage, full of roaming stray cats and dogs, and children playing with tires and makeshift soccer balls. We stumbled upon cages of live chickens unknowing of their fate, camel meat hanging outside butchers’ shops, and rows of ladders stacked against the walls for sale. We saw every kind of speciality shop, from carpenters, to car repairmen, egg sellers, and seamsters.

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We drank tea at a cafe with tables of old men smoking shisha, playing backgammon, and reading the newspaper. We stumbled upon the oldest mosque in Cairo, Ibn Tulun, majestic in its simplicity, serene even in its central location.  We heard “Welcome to Egypt” countless times from local passersby, to which we responded “shukran” (thank you in Arabic).

But most importantly, we saw the true Cairo; a side that we rarely have the opportunity to see. We saw Cairo in each child running in the street, each “welcome to Egypt”, each cup of tea, each throw of the dice, each toothless smile, and each call to prayer.

Despite my original hesitance, I realized that inherent in this aimless walk there was a purpose, and it was just that: to walk aimlessly. It ultimately allowed us to take in everything we saw without, a map, preset route, or destination. And by losing ourselves in Sayeda Zeinab, we found the innocent and beautiful essence of the city in which we live.

Throughout this walk, I realized more and more that this is what I want my 2017 to be: full of discovery, exploration, “yeses” (even if my first instinct might be no!), and full of this amazing man who pushes my boundaries, expands my comfort zone, but unfailingly holds my hand along the way.

C.

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